Hanterion


Andetrion, Dalmatia (Strabo) Anausaro, road station (TP Miller IR col. 571-573. Rav. IV 15). Andarva/Anderba, road station Miller IR col. 462-471. IA Cuntz 338, 7. Rav. IV 16)
Andizetes, Panonian tribe (Strab. VII 314. Ptol. II 15,2) Andautonion (Ptol. II, 14,4), city in Panonia.
Bulentum/Bolentum, if identical with Bulet close to Dubrovnik and if from Alb appellative bulim 'spring' (Jokl, Skok), I think that testifies for its high frequency in many place names with it prefixed form: Ombula/Jambula, Ubla/Obla, Bul-ofçe/Bolec in Dardania etc. Forms Ombula/Jambula are from prefixed form *H1en + bul- with characteristic assimilation -nb- > -mb-, later reduced on -b-/-m-.
From last example we could suppose that place names Andetrion, Anausaro, Andizetes, Andarva, Andautonion are indeed prefixed forms of -detrion, -ausaro, -dizetes, -darva, because H1en is treated in PAlb. as -ân in Gheg dialect and -ën in Tosk one. So except aus- and ar- as a first element on many Illyrian place names, exists also as prefix an- attested in many other place names. Andetrion, Dalmatia (Strabo) Anausaro, road station (TP Miller IR col. 571-573. Rav. IV 15). Andarva/Anderba, road station Miller IR col. 462-471. IA Cuntz 338, 7. Rav. IV 16) Andizetes, Panonian tribe (Strab. VII 314. Ptol. II 15,2)
Andautonion (Ptol. II, 14,4), city in Panonia.
Bulentum/Bolentum, if identical with Bulet close to Dubrovnik and if from Alb appellative bulim 'spring' (Jokl, Skok), I think that testifies for its high frequency in many place names with it prefixed form: Ombula/Jambula, Ubla/Obla, Bul-ofçe/Bolec in Dardania etc. Forms Ombula/Jambula are from prefixed form *H1en + bul- with characteristic assimilation -nb- > -mb-, later reduced on -b-/-m-.
From last example we could suppose that place names Andetrion, Anausaro, Andizetes, Andarva, Andautonion are indeed prefixed forms of -detrion, -ausaro, -dizetes, -darva, because H1en is treated in PAlb. as -ân in Gheg dialect and -ën in Tosk one.
So except aus- and ar- as a first element on many Illyrian place names, exists also as prefix an- attested in many other place names.

Because I haven't access to the Cybalist for ours, I am forced to reply to Sciarreta Antonio that I am aware of the variant form Sanderua in the Tabula Peutingeriana, but we must be aware also that exists Illyrian tribe name Dervanes (Appiani Alexandrini, Historia Romana, Illyrica, paragraph 28), so An-darva/An-derba seems to back up attested forms Andarva and Anderba as primary one.

Konushevci

In fact, Andetrion is "hanterion" (Gon_Hor-Gon basis); related to Skadar (Skender; Skodra); Serbian surname Škundrić; Serb. zagrada (brace, fence, hedge, bracket; there are many Serbian villages with the name Zagradje; hence Serb. zgrada building cf. Serb. kotar district); all related to the Serbian noun 'udar' (from hundar; Serb. verb handriti/udarati beat, pound); Serb. tvrđava, utvrđenje fortress; clearly from Serb. udar/h/anje => utrhenje => utrđenje => utvrđenje (prosthetic "v"). As explained above: Andetrion is nothing else but a Serbo-Slavic ut/v/rdjnje; i.e. a nasalized form uNt/v/rditi/ uNtvrdjenje "adjusted" for the Roman ear.

Anausaro is a present Serbian village of Staro Nagoričane (Staro Nagoričane) near Kumanovo (similar as above Andetrion; derived from Gon-Hor-Gon ur-basis (nagraditi, ograditi fence, brace, nadgraditi; Serb. nadgradje superstructure

Again the same, but this time from Gon.Hor-Bel basis (Serbian tvrđava; from hundarba = utrdba => utvrdba (known in Serbian also as utvrda or tvrđava /fortress/); from the above analyses we can see that Serbo- Slavic word drvo (tree) acqired its name from the name of the fence (Serb. taraba /palisade/; related to tvrđava!)

These three Roman fortresses: Andetrion, Anausaro, Andarva/Anderba were in reality a distorted Serbo-Slavic noun 'tvrðava' (fortress; from utvrda, tvrdina, utvrditi, udariti, handriti, nadgraðe etc…); there are a great number of similar examples which are telling us that Serbo-Slavic people were NATIVE to Balkan (exactly as Ana Komnena stated in her work "The Alexiad") a long time before the VI century and alleged "The great-migration of Slavs". Actually, the Slavs inhabited the Balkan Peninsula even in neolithic times (Lepenski vir, later Vinèa) and they were called the Illyrians by Romans.

Albanians are SO-CALLED (as Ana Komnena referred to them) and they were brought to the Balkan during the 11th century AD

Phonetic laws could sometimes be a big obstacle in a right understanding of the process of language development. In this specific case we have to deal with Gon-Hor basis or with the compounded PIE root gon/ter; it means that we do not need any rules (all we need is a sound mind) to see that German jagen, Eng. hunt, Czech honit and Serb. goniti /drive, chase, hunt/ were derived from the same ur-basis.

It is quite the same if we talk about "in" or "out" because the both phonemes sprang from the same Gon-Hor source. For instance, the Serbian word 'unutar' (inside, indoors) is an equivalent to the English words 'enter', 'under' and 'inter' (cf. Eng. entrails and Serb. unutrica /entrails/ or Serb. 'jetra' /liver/). Serbian verbs 'oterati' (drive off, drive away; from honterati) is comparable to English "outer" world; while Serbian 'uterati' (force in, beat into, corral; from hunterati) is "concordant" to English "in". "Laryngeals" could be helpful here only if we understood that their "vowelization" was determined by the need of "notion distinction" and that it has gone differently in different languages.

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